If you discipline a child, leave him room to turn away from his wrong action so that you do not leave him with stubbornness as his only way out. - Imam Ali (as)

Curriculum

In order to fulfill its mission, Al-Hadi School offers an advanced and rigorous curriculum aimed at preparing students to excel academically. Classroom instruction is designed to deliver curriculum objectives aligned to the National standards. An integrated, center based approach with an emphasis on hands-on, student based learning is employed at all grade levels. Individualized and small group instruction, lower level grades (PreSchool and Elementary classrooms) are self-contained.

Preschool

Al- Hadi Preschool caters to the educational needs of children 18 months through five years of age. Our Preschool Program employs an integrated curriculum which is delivered a multi-sensory approach. We strive to foster a safe and stimulating environment where the creative abilities of each child are nurtured.  The curriculum includes Saxon Phonics, Saxon Mathematics and High Reach Curricula to help preschoolers develop communication, reasoning and social skills as well as prepare them for kindergarten.

Students are exposed daily to memorization of the holy Quran and Arabic language by native speakers. Islamic values are inculcated from the very early ages.

The backbone of our preschool [program the caring, qualified and dedicated teachers composed of well trained and professional teachers who strive to help children grow into unique and confident individuals.

All teachers have child development associate (CDA) certification, CPR, and first aid training. All classrooms are self-contained safe, organized and inviting. They provide a variety of learning centers including, art, library, manipulatives, pretend play, building, science, mathematics, writing, computer and sensory centers.

A typical day in preschool includes, center time, circle time, outdoor and indoor play, lunch and snack, nap, small and large group activities.

Student teacher ratio meets the requirement of licensed child care centers.

Part time and full time schedules are available between, 7:00 and 6:00p.m. Monday to Friday

Elementary

At the elementary grade level, instruction in academic subject areas consisting of Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies is provided by the teacher. Kindergarten students engage in meaningful listening, speaking, writing and reading experiences through the use of poems, books and writing activities designed to develop early reading and writing skills. First grade fosters individual growth in reading and writing. Students are taught common sight words and sound-symbol relationships (phonics) in the context of meaningful application. The Saxon Phonics program trains in phonics awareness to build a strong base for writing and reading fluency.

Students in second grade engage in a greater variety of reading texts while continuing to build writing skills. Daily practice of reading strategies are stressed until students can independently use reading strategies such as predicting, using prior knowledge and retelling.

Third grade students deepen their understanding of text through written and oral language experiences. Students are encouraged to relate what they read to their own lives noting similarities and differences, solving problems and evaluating the characters. The reading program includes a variety of resources such as “Collection for young Scholars and Pearson Guided Reading program. Speaking and listening skills are refined through class discussions, oral presentations etc .

Students in fourth and fifth grades are exposed to a variety of reading materials including fiction, plays, poetry, non-fiction. Children engage in literary discussions to interact with the text and extend their reading comprehension.

Elementary - Social Studies

At Kindergarten level, Social Studies is integrated with Language Arts. The ‘Weekly Studies’ program is used for grades one through 5 in which students use a weekly brightly illustrated newspaper issue which covers the Core Social Studies standards for each grade level.

Students in first and second grades learn concepts such as sharing, responsibility,  citizenship, community, map skill, state symbols.

Elementary - Mathematics

Pearson Math Program is implemented from Kindergarten through fifth grades. The objectives within the Pearson Math Program are in accordance with National standards. The Program stresses critical thinking to develop essential understanding of important math concepts and skills solving aspect.

 

Course Descriptions

Middle and High School

 

Computer Science:

Sixth Grade Computers

This course focuses on essential digital literacy skills such as keyboarding and basic computer applications. Students explore the internet, computational thinking and basic coding. They understand the use of Microsoft Office Word, Excel, PowerPoint presentations, internet usage and online communication, multimedia, hardware and software fundamentals, and online safety.

 

Seventh Grade Computers

The digital literacy course continues to build on the skills and experiences of the previous course.  Students continue learn keyboarding and basic computer applications as well as advance exploration of the internet, computational thinking and basic coding. Focus is placed on Microsoft Office Word, Excel, Power Point, internet usage multimedia, hardware and software fundamentals, online communication and online safety.

 

Eighth Grade Computers

This course,’ Introduction to Computer Applications’ provides an introduction to business computer applications. Students receive hands-on practice in Microsoft Office (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint) software.  Projects include Word announcements, an MLA formatted research paper, and a business letter. Students develop Excel workbooks using formulas, functions, charts, absolute cell references and formatting.  Students are expected to create PowerPoint slide shows with bulleted lists, themes, clip art, and slide transitions.

 

Webpage Design 0.5 CREDIT

In this course, students gain a foundational knowledge of website creation and apply the information to the plan, design and develop a website. By the end of this course the students are able to create, and code basic HTML, XHTML and CSS files. Equipped with a historical understanding of the web’s evolution and key industry-standard design guidelines to ensure strong online presentation, students build a foundational knowledge of website creation and apply it to the plan, design and develop a web page. Critical thinking is encouraged through class interactions and projects. Through Design and Development of Web Pages, students are exposed to Internet concepts. This course presents a more in-depth view of the design and development issues that need to be considered for a multi-platform international implementation.

 

Fundamental Programing, I (Using Python) 0.5 CREDIT

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of structured programming. Topics include software development methodology, data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of running, testing, and debugging.

 

English Language Arts

Grade 6  

This course, based on Spring Board curriculum develops and refines skills in critical thinking, close reading, writing in various genres, and research. Students are introduced to multiple genres to widen their understanding and scope of the literary world. Students focus on writing narrative, explanatory, and argumentative essays. Emphasis is placed on specific strategies for planning, drafting, revising, and editing.  Students explore the fundamentals of research, such as citations and evaluating the credibility of sources. They also deepen their understanding of news media. Students understand and analyze the elements of a novel, short stories and poems.  The course exposes students to grammar and sentence-composing tools, which includes four sentence manipulation activities: unscrambling, combining, imitating, and expanding.

 

Grade 7

This course, based on Spring Board curriculum, refines and builds on the skills taught the previous year.  Focus is placed on Close Reading strategies to discover the explicit and implicit content of texts. Students specifically focus on writing argumentative, explanatory, and narrative modes, along with essays and personal narratives. The course examines print texts as portrayed in film. Students complete print advertisement as a project and become familiar with the various strategies used in the world of advertisement. The students also explore the world of mythology across the globe and see its effects throughout history. Students read selected novels, short stories and poems. To build on the sentence-composing skills students work in detail on the different types of phrases and their construction. Basic grammar skills continue to be taught throughout the year.

 

Grade 8 English Language Arts:

This course, based on Spring Board curriculum, enhances and deepens the skills covered in Grades 6 & 7 and prepares the students for high school College Board curriculum. Students read and analyze a wide range of texts in different genres. They learn to write in various forms; essays, personal narratives, argumentative texts, editorials, and research papers. They learn about the hero archetype and the hero's journey narrative in literature. Students explore the world history of genocide across the globe. They research an issue and create a multimedia presentation. They explore and analyze how the adaptation in a film differs from the actual source, the novel.  To complete the tools of sentence-composing, the students focus on the different types of clause and how to employ them effectively. Basic grammar skills continue to be taught throughout the year.

 

High School ELA

EnglishI Pre-AP/English I

The English I Pre-AP course is based on the Level 4 Springboard curriculum developed by the College Board to develop strong skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and prepare students for Advanced Placement coursework in grades 11 and 12. Students enrolled in this course are expected to demonstrate a commitment to the accelerated pace and rigorous curriculum and seek assistance as needed.

Students enrolled English I Pre-AP will explore the theme of Coming of Age and associated topics. Readings include selections from a variety of genres, including fictional works such as To Kill a Mockingbird, Bronx Masqerade and Julius Caesar, and poetry selections from poets such as Emily Dickinson and Pablo Neruda.  Students will produce argumentative, narrative, and informational texts, as well as a poetry anthology and weekly informal in-class writing to check comprehension.  They will engage in individual and group activities on topics related to Coming of Age and analyze written and visual texts on a variety of topics. Students are expected to participate fully in all discussions and activities and make regular oral presentations..

 

English II Pre-AP/English II:

The English II Pre-AP course is based on the Level 5 Springboard curriculum developed by the College Board to develop strong skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and prepare students for Advanced Placement coursework in grades 11 and 12. Students enrolled in this course are expected to demonstrate a commitment to the accelerated pace and rigorous curriculum and seek assistance as needed.

 Students enrolled English II Pre-AP explore the theme of culture and the extent to which culture influences identity and worldview, among other topics. Readings include selections from a variety of genres, including fictional works such as Bless Me Ultima, Things FallApart and Antigone, and non-fiction selections such as "The Hunger of Memory" and "Us and Them." Students produce argumentative, narrative, and informational texts, as well as weekly informal in-class writing to check comprehension.  They engage in individual and group research activities on topics related to culture and analyze written and visual texts on a variety of topics. Students are expected to participate fully in all discussions and activities and make regular oral presentations.

 

English III Pre-AP/English III

The English III Pre-AP course is based on the Level 6 Springboard curriculum developed by the College Board to develop strong skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and prepare students for Advanced Placement coursework in grade 12. Students enrolled in this course are expected to demonstrate a commitment to the accelerated pace and rigorous curriculum and seek assistance as needed.

Students enrolled English III Pre-AP explore the American Dream and the various ways it is expressed through literary movements and American voices. Readings include selections from a variety of genres, including fictional works such as Uncle Tom's Cabin, The Great Gatsby and Their Eyes Were Watching God, and non-fiction selections such as JFK's Inaugural Address and Mark Twain's Advice to Youth. Students will produce argumentative, narrative, and informational texts, as well as weekly informal in-class writing to check comprehension.  They  engage in individual and group research activities on topics related to the foundation and development of the American Dream and analyze written and visual texts on a variety of topics. Students are expected to participate fully in all discussions and activities and make regular oral presentations.

 

English IV Pre-AP/English IV

The English IV Pre-AP course is based on the Senior English Springboard curriculum developed by the College Board to develop strong skills in reading, writing, listening, and speaking and prepare students for college-level work. Students enrolled in this course are expected to demonstrate a commitment to the accelerated pace and rigorous curriculum and seek assistance as needed.

Students enrolled English IV Pre-AP explore various perspectives through literary theories such as Reader Response Criticism and Cultural Criticism. Readings include selections from a variety of genres, including fictional works such as The Hunger Artist, Pygmalion and Othello, and non-fiction selections such as selections from Santiago Baca's A Place to Stand and George Orwell's Shooting an Elephant. Students produce argumentative, narrative, and informational texts, as well as weekly informal in-class writing to check comprehension.  They engage in individual and group research activities on topics related to various perspectives, values, prejudices and attitudes, and analyze written and visual texts on a variety of topics. Students are expected to participate fully in all discussions and activities and make regular oral presentations.

 

Middle School Mathematics

Pre-AP Math 6 Course 2
This course introduces students to algebraic reasoning, integers, and rational numbers. Students learn to apply rational numbers, find patterns, and create functions, and solve multi-step equations and inequalities. In additions, students cover proportional relationships, percent, probability, collecting, displaying, and analyzing data, and end with the introduction to geometric figures and the measurement of two-dimensional and three-dimensional figures. 

Pre-AP Math 7 Course 3
This course examines and reviews all the concepts taught in middle school and prepares them for Algebra I. The topics studies include principles of algebra, rational numbers, graphs and functions, sequences, exponents and roots, ratios, proportions, similarity, percent, foundations of geometry, perimeter, area, volume, data, statistics, and probability, multi-step equations and inequalities, graphing lines, and polynomials.

 

High School Mathematics

Algebra 1: Algebra 1 is designed to be a foundation for all future mathematics courses. The fundamentals of algebraic problem-solving are taught. Students will explore foundations of Algebra, solving equations, solving inequalities, an introduction to functions, linear functions, systems of equations and inequalities, exponents and exponential functions, polynomials and factoring, quadratic functions and equations, radical expressions and equations, and basic data analysis and probability. Throughout the course, TEKS standards are taught and reinforced as the student learns how to apply the concepts in real world problems.

 

Geometry: This course is designed to emphasize the study of the properties and applications of common geometric figures in 2D and 3D.  It includes the study of geometric transformations.  Right triangle trigonometry and general trigonometric topics are introduced. Inductive and deductive thinking skills are used in problem solving situations, and applications to the real world are stressed.  It also teaching writing proofs to solve or show properties of geometric figures.

 

Algebra 2: This course is an extension of the Algebra 1 curriculum. Topics that were first introduced in Algebra 1 will be built upon and applied to problems that require higher order thinking skills. Fundamental skills of mathematics will be applied to such topics as functions, equations and inequalities, probability and statistics, logarithmic and exponential relationships, quadratic and polynomial equations, and matrices. Technology will be used to introduce and expand upon the areas of study listed above. Use of computers and graphing calculators will be incorporated into each chapter.

 

PreCalculus: This course is designed to cover topics in Algebra ranging from polynomial, rational, and exponential functions to conic sections.  Trigonometry concepts learned in previous courses will be studied in depth. Students will then begin analytic geometry and calculus concepts such as limits and continuity.

 

Middle School Science:

Sixth Grade Pre- AP Science

Students enrolled in this accelerated course begin to use the scientific methods to increase their understanding of earth, physical, and life science. Students study the classification of living things; the human body; cell structure and function; sexual and asexual reproduction; genetics; microbes, algae, and fungi; and plant reproduction.  Physical science enhances students understanding of sound, light, and heat; elements and compounds; electricity and its uses; electric and magnetic interaction; potential and kinetic energy; simple machines; inventions; and nuclear power.  In Earth science students understand climate and weather; conservation; space and the universe; oceans, geology; and recycling.

 

Seventh Grade Pre- AP Science

This accelerated course allows students tomove onto more complex components supported by math skills and a more in-depth study of previously-learned concepts in addition to the introduction of new skills and topics.  Students continue to further explore general life, earth, and physical science topics using the scientific method. This  course provides  common life science topics include scientific classification; cells and cell structure; heredity and genetics; and human organ systems and their function.  Earth science includes an in depth study of the effects of weather and climate; properties and uses of water; atmosphere; air pressure; ​rocks, soil, and minerals; eclipses; phases of the moon; tides; and conservation; ecology and environment.  Physical science exposes students to Newton's laws of motion; the structure of atoms and molecules; heat and energy; the Periodic Table; the chemical and physical changes of matter; elements and compounds; mixtures and solutions; and the properties of waves.

  

Pre AP Integrated Physics and Chemistry

This high school, one credit course is not only rigorous but also fast paced.  Students are expected to read beyond the text and complete several assignments.  The course is designed to challenge students beyond grade-level and prepares them for success in future advanced coursework like biology, chemistry and environmental science.   The course requires students to demonstrate high level of interest and aptitude in this area.

 

Biology; Pre-AP Biology

Biology is the study of the structure, growth, and function of life systems of selected organisms.  This laboratory-oriented course encompasses historical contributions to biological concepts; energy production, transfer, and use in living system; and the interrelatedness of organisms with each other and with environments.
 Students acquire data using their senses and instrumentation.  Observations are made of living organisms in the environment, prepared specimens, various ecosystems, and inherited traits.  Student investigations emphasize accurate observations, collection of data, data analysis, and the safe manipulation of laboratory apparatus and materials in the field and the laboratory. 

 

Chemistry; Pre-AP Chemistry

Chemistry is the study of the structure, composition, and behavior of matter. It is a laboratory-oriented course that stresses observation of matter, classification of matter, measurement of chemical quantities, manipulation of chemical investigations, and prediction of chemical phenomena. The laboratory investigations emphasize the safe manipulation of laboratory apparatus and materials, accurate observations, data collection and analysis, and the communication of data through formal lab reports. The topics covered in Chemistry include: scientific measurement, matter and change, atomic structure, nuclear chemistry, chemical periodicity, chemical bonding, chemical formulas of elements and compounds, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, states of matter, representative gases, aqueous solutions, acids/bases, and oxidation-reduction reactions.

 

Environmental Science  

Environmental science is the study of the natural sciences in an interdisciplinary context that always includes consideration of people and how they have influenced various systems around us. It includes many aspects of biology, earth and atmospheric sciences, fundamental principles of chemistry and physics, human population dynamics, and an appreciation for the Earth and its natural resources. Covered topics include energy and cycling of matter, stability and change in ecosystems, and human activities and technology on ecosystems. 

 

Engineering Design and Analysis

This course engages students in authentic engineering practices and to embrace an engineer’s habits of mind. The basis of this course is collaborative.  Student-directed projects empower students to think like engineers, to adopt engineering processes, and to pursue engineering disciplines for the betterment of our world. Students reverse engineer a consumer product to think about how someone else designed it – and how they could do it better. Students learn how to collaboratively collect, analyze, represent, and argue using data to make better engineering decisions. Once students know how engineers design and how to make data-driven decisions, they are ready to apply these abilities, along with basic coding skills, to design more complex solutions in a systems engineering capstone challenge.

 

Physics   

HS Physics is composed of thirty-five major topical groups: 1. Mechanics ,Light,  Electricity , Thermodynamics, Electromagnetism, Quantum Physics, Atomic Physics , and Nuclear physics. Mechanics focuses on knowledge and application of nine major topics: Describing motion, vector Addition, A mathematical Model of Motion, Forces, Forces and motion in Two Dimensions, Universal Gravitation, Momentum and its conservation , energy ,work, and Simple Machines. Thermodynamics focuses on knowledge and application of two major topics: Thermal Energy: States of Matter. The Light focuses on knowledge and application of four major topics: Light, Reflection and Refraction, Mirrors and Lenses, Diffration and Interference. The Sound component focuses on two topics: Waves and Energy transfer, and sound. The electricity & magnetism component of this course focuses on knowledge and application of seven major topics: electrostatics, electric fields, electric circuits, magnetic fields and electromagnetism. The quantum portion of Physics encompasses 3 topics: Quantum Theory, the atom,  and Solid State Electronics. The Nuclear Physics Section covers two topics: The nucleus and Nuclear Applications.

  

Social Studies

Grade 6 Social Studies:

Grade six students study contemporary world cultures. They are provided with the tools to create a richer understanding of the world today and the people and societies that populate it. They students explore world geography and develop skills such as map reading, research, and civic participation are integrated throughout the lessons.

 

Grade 7 Social Studies:

Grade seven students cover the history of Texas comprehensively. They learn about the early human civilization in the area and how various civilizations have had a significant impact on what it is today. The students learn the history of the slogan “Six Flags over Texas”. They are provided with the tools to create a richer understanding of Texas's past and its impact today.

 

Physical Education:

MIDDLE SCHOOL PHYSICAL EDUCATION

At Middle School level, Physical education instructions is addressed through active participation in a sequence of activity units. Fitness is addressed through a specific fitness unit as well as through fitness activities imbedded in each activity unit. Muscular Strength and Endurance, Flexibility and Cardiovascular fitness is tested through games such as basketball, soccer, volleyball, badminton etc.

High School Physical Education:

At High School level students aim to meet standards in demonstrating competency in skills, movement concepts, principles, strategies and tactics in physical activities thought games, drills and exercises. Students learn to identify, apply and assess their skills in game play as well as their personal health and fitness level and be able to design a regime for a healthy lifestyle.

 

World Language:

Spanish I
This course is designed to focus on the language and culture of Spanish speaking countries. Students will learn to use basic vocabulary for various topics that include greetings, after-school activities, snack, meals, foods, beverages, daily schedules, telling time, numbers, clothing, shopping. Students will describe themselves and others, their classes and locations, and learn how to get around the town or go to a place or location.

Spanish II
This course continues to focus on the language and culture of Spanish speaking countries. Students learn to use basic vocabulary for various topics that include household items, furniture, sports, sending emails, talking about when events occur, daily routines, and vacation plans. Students will describe a house, plan a party or event, complete chores, learn how to stay healthy, and discuss vacation and leisure activities

Spanish III
This course continue to build and enrich the focus on the language and culture of Spanish speaking countries. Students learn to use basic vocabulary for various topics that include going on a trip or vacation, completing daily chores, playing sports, staying healthy, going to the market, reading about legends and stories from the past and present. Students learn how describe and prepare food, order meals in a restaurant, make movies, write in the school newspaper, describe family and friends, and talk about careers and professions.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

Middle School, Grade 8 Pre-AP & On Grade Level US History:

Pre AP US History immerses students in a powerful journey through the history of the United States from its earliest foundations to the age of Industrialism. Al-Hadi Pre-AP courses are designed to challenge students and prepare them for success beyond Middle School level. While based on the grade level curriculum (TEKS), these advanced or above grade level courses move at a faster pace, are more academically challenging and require more independent learning than regular academic courses. Pre-AP courses require higher performance standards than the on grade level course. Students are placed in the course level based on their performance.

Length: Two Semesters-Credit :1.0

 

Grade 9 Pre-AP World Geography

World Geography studies provide students the opportunity to study the interaction of people and their physical environments in the major areas of the world.  Content introduces the student to the world geographers, their unique vocabulary, tools, and methodologies.  Students acquire an understanding of the physical setting of the Earth, locate and study different land forms and regions of the world, learn how people and geography impact each other, and are introduced to urban analysis.  Content offers students the opportunity to put into practice the geographical concepts and skills they have accumulated throughout the social studies program beginning in the elementary grades and in the Texas and United States history courses.

Length: Two Semesters- Credit:1.0

 

Grade 10 Pre-AP World History:

The AP Course is offered as a self-study course with Teacher guidance and support.

This course includes further study of the history and development of world cultures that students encountered throughout the elementary grades and earlier secondary social studies courses.  Content includes the development of early civilizations, western civilization, and other world regions from their early days to the present.
 
This course provides students the opportunity to compare and analyze various ways of life and cultural patterns that reflect the diversity and commonality of human experiences and the understanding of how these patterns occur. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. Geographic influence on world history is a part of the study.

Length: two Semesters-Credit: 1.0

 

Grade 11 Pre-AP Government:

This course will give students an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students should become acquainted with the variety of theoretical perspectives and explanations for various behaviors and outcomes. Length: one Semester-Credit: 0.5

 

Advanced Placement (AP)

Advanced Placement (AP) courses offered at Al-Hadi School are meant to challenge any student who wants or needs to be pushed to a higher level of scholarship. Because all AP courses align to the rigorous, college-level standards set by the College Board, each course prepares students to take a subject-specific exam and potentially earn college credit in selected academic areas.

Being Successful in AP Courses 
AHS encourages students to take AP courses, but to also carefully balance these courses' increased rigor with other curricular, co-curricular and extra-school commitments (e.g., work, community service, family, sports). AP courses will have a heavier work load than other courses in the same discipline.  In order to opt for AP courses the student must demonstrate:

  • Character - Curiosity, creativity and commitment are key ingredients for success in AP courses.
  • Academic Preparation - Students don't need to be top of their class to be an AP student, but they will want to be prepared for the AP course they choose.
  • Motivation - Students will show their determination when they do the things that matter to them. AP students should have a passion for the subject area.

AP students should also be strong readers and excel at writing. These courses often demand more independent study and academic initiative from students.

AP Enrollment Process 
To enroll in an AP course students’ need to meet the prerequisites for the specific course. Academic Coordinator will assist students (and parents) in course selection based on a student's interests, strengths and commitment.

All AP students at Al-Hadi are encouraged to take the corresponding national exam in the spring. This requirement, offers a true comparison of how AHS students compare academically to other students locally, statewide and nationally, who also take the exam rather than those who just complete the course.

 

AP Language and Composition: 

The course overview and objectives for this course are taken from the AP English Course Description published by the College Board; the selection of texts is based on College Board recommendations. While most of the selections read are non-fiction, students  also analyze rhetorical strategies in fictional works such as Uncle Tom’s CabinThe Great Gatsby and Macbeth. The course includes “…expository, analytical, and argumentative writing that forms the basis of academic and professional communication,” and the various selections included serve as models for such writing. In addition to formal essays, students engage in a variety of written activities. Students also participate in a variety of discussion activities and complete extensive grammatical and style activities to improve written communication. Finally, as this course culminates in a timed AP exam, students practice multiple-choice and timed writing exercises throughout the year.

AP Literature and Composition:

This rigorous course seeks to engage highly motivated and responsible students in the reading and analysis of a selection of works spanning several centuries and geographic regions. During this course, students hone in on writing and communication skills to ensure success in college coursework and the AP English Literature and Composition exam.

Reading: Reading in this course includes works from the literary genres of expository prose, prose fiction, poetry, and drama. Each work is selected for its complexity and value within its genre and the composite list of works includes selections incorporating a wide variety of styles and themes. Reading selections include BeowulfFrankenstein and King Lear.

Writing: Writing assignments include expository, research-based and literary analysis essays as well as regular in-class writing responses, practice essays for the AP exam, and extensive poetry analysis assignments. Each graded essay includes three separate drafts and is evaluated by both peers and instructor on the strength of the content; organization, including use of appropriate transitions; variety in sentence structure, and effective use of rhetoric and vocabulary.

 

AP Calculus: This course involves a study of limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals. Topics covered include detailed study of the first and second derivative of polynomial, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions with applications to curve-tracing, maxima-minima related-rate problems, and the anti-derivative.  

 There will be further study and discussion of the fundamental principles of calculus.  Advanced topics in integration will include arc length, work problems, additional techniques in integration.  This course will prepare students for the College Board Advanced Placement Calculus AB examination.

 

AP Statistics: This course involves the study of four main areas: exploratory analysis; planning a study; probability; and statistical inference. College Board expects that upon entering this course, students have mathematical maturity and quantitative reasoning ability. Mathematical maturity may be defined as a complete working knowledge of the graphical and algebraic concepts through Math Analysis, including linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. This course will require reading of the text. This AP Statistics course is taught as an activity-based course in which students actively construct their own understanding of the concepts and techniques of statistics.

 

AP Chemistry:

Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry is a fast-paced, challenging course that integrates general and specialized areas of chemistry concepts with quantitative and qualitative analysis. The topics covered in this course include the study of matter, chemical measurements, stoichiometry, aqueous solutions, prediction of chemical reactions, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, chemical thermodynamics, chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, electronic structure, periodic properties, chemical bonding, molecular geometry, bonding theories, gases, intermolecular forces, liquids, and solids. Laboratory investigations that support these topics emphasize accurate observations of chemical reactions and substances, analysis of unknowns, recording of data, calculating and interpreting results based on the quantitative data obtained, and communicating the results of experimental work. As an advanced course, AP Chemistry has recommended prerequisites of Chemistry and Physics; the latter may be taken concurrently with AP Chemistry. 

 

Advanced Placement Biology

AP Biology is the study of general biological principles as well as the more specialized biological sciences.  Cytology, biochemistry, developmental biology, genetics, ecology, taxonomy, and various aspects of adaptation are integrated within this laboratory-oriented course.  Relationship and applications of concepts within and among the various sciences are explored.  As an advanced course, Biology AP has as recommended prerequisites Biology and Chemistry I.  Biology AP and Chemistry may be taken concurrently.  
 
Students acquire data by using their senses and instrumentation.  Student investigations should emphasize accurate observations, collection of data, data analysis, and the safe manipulation of laboratory apparatus and materials in the laboratory and field.

 

Grade 9 AP Human Geography:

This AP Course is offered as a self-study course with Teacher guidance and support. Human Geography involves the study of people from a spatial and ecological perspective. People are central to geography and their activities help shape Earth’s surface largely through their interaction with the physical environment. Human settlements and structures are part of that tapestry interaction. Students will study human characteristics including language, religion, political systems, economic systems, population distribution and quality of life.

 Length: two Semesters-Credit: 1.0

 

Grade 10 AP World History:

The AP Course is offered as a self-study course with Teacher guidance and support.

This course includes further study of the history and development of world cultures that students encountered throughout the elementary grades and earlier secondary social studies courses.  Content includes the development of early civilizations, western civilization, and other world regions from their early days to the present.
 
This course provides students the opportunity to compare and analyze various ways of life and cultural patterns that reflect the diversity and commonality of human experiences and the understanding of how these patterns occur. This understanding is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and appropriate analytical skills. Geographic influence on world history is a part of the study.

Length: two Semesters-Credit: 1.0

 

Grade 12 Pre AP United States History:

United States History – AP: The Pre-AP program in United States History is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, their reliability, and their importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship.

Length: two Semesters-Credit: 1.0